WMF Journal


May 11, 2012

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The Future of the Ruta de la Amistad

Posted by Daniela Pérez Fernández, Director of Communications for Patronato Ruta de la Amistad A.C.
World Monuments Fund

One of the most outstanding projects created as a result of the 1968 Mexico Cultural Olympics, the Ruta de la Amistad, or Road of Friendship, is the world’s largest sculpture corridor. The 17-kilometer route is made up of 19 stations (sculptures) built in concrete by artists from the five continents, with heights ranging from 7 to 26 meters.

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May 7, 2012

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Ruta de la Amistad, or Road of Friendship

Posted by Norma Barbacci, Program Director for Latin America, Spain, and Portugal
World Monuments Fund
“Signs”/“Señales” by Mexican sculptor Ángela Gurría

A few months ago I visited the “Ruta de la Amistad” in Mexico City, and fell in love with this collection of monumental sculptures which were commissioned for the 1968 Olympics to symbolize world brotherhood and friendship, as its name “Road of Friendship” implies.

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April 18, 2012

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Remembering Hatra, Iraq’s First World Heritage Site

Posted by Alessandra Peruzzetto, Program Specialist, Archaeology and the Middle East
World Monuments Fund
© Italian Archaeological Mission at Hatra - University of Torino, 1990s

Alessandra Peruzzetto, WMF’s Middle East Program Specialist, spent several seasons excavating at Hatra, a World Heritage site. In the following post, she reflects on the history of the site and her memories of working there.

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April 17, 2012

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A Short History Of Akaba Idéna

Posted by Thierry Joffroy, CRAterre-ENSAG
The magic entry, is protected by hidden amulets
The magic entry is protected by hidden amulets

The oral traditions of Kétou say that Prince Shopashan left Ile-Ife (the capital of the Yoruba Kingdom) with his family and other members of his clan to install a new kingdom at Aro. A few generations later, his descendant, King Ede, left Aro with 120 families to settle in Kétou.

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April 10, 2012

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Marking the Routes of the Silk Roads

Posted by Natalia Turekulova, ICOMOS Kazakhstan
World Monuments Fund
Fragment of the view on Shopan Ata necropolis, 2011

Old necropolises are some of the only man-made landmarks that can be seen along the main routes that cross the vast steppes and deserts of the Mangystau peninsula and the Usturt Plateau, between the Caspian and the Aral Seas. These ancient roads, which are still in use, in the Middle Ages connected Khorezmian and Sogdian lands with the territories to the north and west of the Caspian Sea.

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