WMF Journal


March 13, 2012

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One Year After the Japan Earthquake: A Journey, Part II

Posted by Henry Tzu Ng, Executive Vice President
World Monuments Fund

While not well visited by foreigners, this isolation is one of the reasons Japanese treasure this area—rural, agricultural, isolated— “the old Japan” —not only scenically, but in terms of the agrarian pace of life and a real landscape of snow covered mountains and trees that we see as we whisk by in our car. To the left are the Ōu Mountains, the longest mountain range in Japan dotted with age-old volcanoes and stretching 311 miles south from Aomori Prefecture to the Nasu volcanoes at the northern boundary of the Kantō region. These dramatic, high, snow covered mountains, with the highest peak around 6,700 feet—popular with skiers—accompany us for a long part of our drive. This terrain is “typical Tohoku” and unlike most of Japan. It has a refreshing alpine quality, and so different from the heavily tourist travelled areas, especially those south of Tokyo that are dense with modern urban cities strung together along the rail lines.

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March 12, 2012

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One Year After the Japan Earthquake: A Journey, Part I

Posted by Henry Tzu Ng, Executive Vice President
World Monuments Fund
Kesennuma earthquake damage, 2011

The fishing port of Kesennuma on the border of Miyagi and Iwate prefectures on the east coast of Japan was heavily damaged in the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the Tohoku area of Japan in March 2011. Images of huge fishing boats that were swept up by the tsunami waves and thrown inland and images of the spilled fuel from the town's fishing fleet that burned for four days were some of the mostly widely published photos of the disaster.

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March 9, 2012

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Stobi Looks to the Future

Posted by Yiannis Avramides, Program Associate
Aerial view of Stobi from the Southeast (2009)
Aerial view of Stobi from the Southeast, 2009

In December I visited Stobi, an archaeological site that is included on the 2012 World Monuments Watch. My hosts were Silvana Blaževska, the director of National Institution Stobi, and Goce Pavlovski, a staff archaeologist who gave me an information-packed tour of the ancient city. Last year, the institution nominated the site to the World Monuments Watch to draw international attention to the opportunities for conserving and interpreting this site.

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March 6, 2012

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St. Paraskewa Church, 2011
St. Paraskewa Church, 2011

Taking advantage of vacationing in Poland during Thanksgiving week in 2011, I made it a point to visit a number of sites in the country that had been listed on the World Monuments Watch over time. Some, like Prozna Street, I had been to before and frequently. Others were totally new to me. My goal was to visit St. Paraskewa’s Church in Radruż, which is on the 2012 World Monuments Watch.

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February 28, 2012

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Walpi Looks to the Future

Posted by Wesley Bernardini, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Redlands
Snake Dance Rock
Snake Dance Rock: south path, main plaza

By Wesley Bernardini, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Redlands

It’s both exciting and challenging to be part of the team working to restore and preserve Walpi Village. I’ve been working with members of the Hopi Cultural Preservation Office for more than 10 years to document and protect Hopi cultural resources, but Walpi Village represents by far the biggest project we’ve tackled.

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