WMF Journal


May 16, 2014

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A Vision for Newstead Abbey

Posted by Alexis Chema, 2013 WMF Britain Yale Scholar
World Monuments Fund

As part of the 2013 WMF/Yale/Mellon Scholarship, Alexis Chema wrote a research report on Newstead Abbey, a manor house created on the site of a twelfth-century monastery following the Dissolution of the Monasteries. The house, ancestral home of the romantic poet Lord Byron, was on the 2012 World Monuments Watch.

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May 8, 2014

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The Museum at Dungarpur

Posted by Mrinalini Venkateswaran, Projects Manager, Eka Archiving Services Pvt. Ltd.
World Monuments Fund

Dungarpur in southern Rajasthan is the little-known capital of the erstwhile eponymous princely state. Its name, Dungarpur, or “city of hills,” describes the town’s topography, comprised of picturesque hills covered with scrub and desert vegetation.

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May 7, 2014

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From Erbil to Amman: a Comparative Study-Tour in Jordan

Posted by Gina Haney and Alessandra Peruzzetto, Co-Directors, Cultural Heritage Conservation and Management Program (Erbil, Iraq)
World Monuments Fund

In March 2014 World Monuments Fund held a comparative study tour in Jordan for Dr. Abdullah Khorsheed, Director of the Iraqi Institute for the Conservation of Archaeology and Heritage in Erbil. The goal was to expose the director of an emerging research and conservation institution in Iraq to established institutions in Jordan.

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May 7, 2014

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Reflections about Tiles and Reflective Glass in Andahuaylillas

Posted by Norma Barbacci, Program Director for Latin America, Spain, and Portugal
World Monuments Fund

While driving from the Cusco Airport to Andahuaylillas, a historic town 41 kilometers south of the former capital of the Inca Empire, I observed several buildings clad in shiny bathroom tiles spelling Celima-Trebol with large letters.

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May 2, 2014

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Georgetown’s City Hall

Posted by National Trust of Guyana
World Monuments Fund

The conservation of historic buildings and sites in Guyana is ongoing. The agencies involved are both private and public. Without the support of laws, and meaningful lobbying, some of the historic ruins and larger historic buildings have fallen, deteriorated, and have even been sold.

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