WMF Journal


May 28, 2015

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Structural Issues at Phnom Bakheng

Posted by Chiv Phirum, Engineer, WMF Program in Angkor
Condition of the North elevation at level F and E
Condition of the North elevation at level F and E

Phnom Bakheng has structural issues at several locations. These structures have collapsed due to forward leaning walls, movements, or shifts of the structure, and uncontrolled vegetation grows in between the walls and the bedrock. The walls were also subjected to water and soil induced deterioration of the laterite foundation and bedrock, and they couldn’t support the weight of the structure.

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May 28, 2015

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Ancient Khmer Masonry at Phnom Bakheng

Posted by Cheam Phally, Senior Architect, WMF Program in Angkor
A stone mortise and tenon joint
A stone mortise and tenon joint

For almost 20 years I have worked on the conservation and restoration of Angkor monuments, and I have learned many things from the construction techniques of these Khmer monuments. Construction materials used for almost all the Khmer temples are basically the same, including sandstone, laterite, and bricks.

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May 27, 2015

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Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative Visit to Phnom Bakheng

Posted by Ginevra Boatto, Administrative Coordinator, World Monuments Fund Cambodia
World Monuments Fund
YSEALI students pose for a group photo at the top of the temple of Phnom Bakheng

On April 25, 2015, a group of 110 students, primarily from ASEAN countries, visited the World Monuments Fund conservation program at the temple of Phnom Bakheng. The students were participants in the Young Southeast Asian Leaders Initiative (YSEALI), a program of the U.S.

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May 22, 2015

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Tamirat ki Kothi
Tamirat ki Kothi

The Tamirat ki Kothi is believed to have been built in the 17th century during the rule of King Vir Singh Deo as the residence for the king’s manager of public roads and state buildings. The Kothi is comprised of gateways, courtyards, and colonnaded spaces that were made with stone and brick masonry. However, it is in a highly dilapidated condition.

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May 18, 2015

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Patan Royal Palace Complex after April earthquakre. Photo KVPT.
Patan Royal Palace Complex after April earthquakre. Photo KVPT.

Since 1991, Kathmandu Valley Preservation Trust (KVPT), based in New York City, has restored and preserved Nepal's magnificent cultural architectural treasures for Nepali's and the international community. WMF has worked with KVPT over the last ten years to produce a multiphase preservation plan for the Patan Royal Palace Complex.

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